Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Roman Polanski

Roman Polanski newspaper reports from the time of his pre-trial and trial in 1977 for the rape of a 13 year old girl:


The Associated Press May 20, 1977,

Roman Polanski's prosecutor said at a pretrial hearing Friday that a quantity of the drug Quaalude and photographs seized from the film director "substantiate almost every point" of rape and drug charges lodged by a 13-year-old girl.
Superior Court Judge Laurrence Rittenband denied defense motions for dismissal, for an extraordinary preliminary hearing to inquire into the girl's sexual history or for any pretrial deposition taken from the teen-ager.
Deputy Dist. Atty. Roger Gunson said
Polanski, 43, had Quaalude tablets, a tranquilizing drug, "on his person and in his room" when he was taken into custody March 11. He said the photographs placed in evidence at a grand jury hearing were those that Polanski took of the girl for the French edition of Vogue Magazine.He declined to tell reporters whether the pictures show the girl in nude.
"There are photographs recovered and Quaalude tablets . . . that substantiate almost every point she testifies to," said Gunson.
His statements came after
Polanski's attorney, Douglas Dalton, claimed that the only physical piece of evidence corroborating the girl's story is a pair of semen-stained undergarments which he claimed cannot be connected to the Polanski case.
"The victim wasn't wearing the garments at the time the officer arrived," Dalton said.
"She went to another part of the house, got the garment and gave it to the officers."
He suggested that the 13-year-old might have had sexual intercourse with someone else that day.
Dalton also said that the girl has testified that "she was drunk at the time" she was alegedly given a Quaalude tablet by
Polanski.
"She said she'd been drunk on other occasions and had been under the influence of Quaalude on other occasions," he said.


The Associated Press August 8, 1977, ...

Movie director Roman Polanski, red-eyed and nervous, pleaded guilty Monday to unlawful sexual intercourse with a 13-year-old girl, the least serious of six drug and rape charges against him.
"I had sexual intercourse with a female person not my wife under the age of 18," Polanski, 43, responded to a prosecutor's question.
The maximum sentence for the charge is 5 years in jail, But Dist. Atty. John Wan de Kamp, who recommended that Polanski's plea be accepted to protect the identity of the girl, said afterward that sentences of 16 months to three years are generaly imposed.Superior Court Judge Laurance Rittenband, who accepted the plea, ordered psychiatric examinations for Polanski and sat a hearing for Sept. 19. Sentencing would come sometime after that.
Polanski, a France citizen of Polish background said in the packed courtroom that the relized one possible consequence of his guilty plea could be deportations.
In a neat gray pinstrips suit, polanski admitted he amd the girl had sex March 10 at the Mulholland Drive home of actor Jack Nicholson and said the knew the girl's age.
"I understand her to be 13," Polanski said.
"Did you understand her to be 13 when you had sexual intercourse with her?" asked Deputy Dist. Atty. Roger Guson.
Polanski, paused, conferred with his attorney, then said said quietly: "Yes."
he had been charged with drugging and raping the girl. The prosecution said its acceptance of a lesser plea would avoid a sensational trial which could traumatize the girl.
A lawyer for the girl's family. Lawrence Silver, said: "Astigma would attack to her for the rest of her lifetime."
Van de Kamp's statement suit, "we chose to . . . provide the victim with the opportunity to grow up in a world where she'll not be known as the young girl with whom Roman Polanski had sexual intercourse."
Outside, pursued by an army of cameramen, Polanski snapped. "Don't you have the decency to leave me alone."
The hearing came on the eve of the eighth anniversary of the murder of Polanski's wife, actress Sharon Tats. She was slain Aug. 9, 1939, with four friends at the Polanski was in Europe at the time. Manson and the followers were convicted of the murders.
In return for the plea, the prosecution recommended that the judge drop the five other counts of Polanski's indictment: furnishing a drug to a miner, lewd or lascivious act upon a child under 14, rape by use of drugs, Perversion, and sodomy.
The most serious were those involving drugs, which carried sentences of 10 years to life imprisonment.
If sentenced to a year or more, Polanski would be suject to deportation under U.S. immigration laws, which provide deportation for aliens convicted of crime of moral turpitude.
Joseph Sureck, district director of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, said Polanski had applied for a change of his alien status to become a permanent resident of the United States.
"But everything more or less is held up right now pending the outcome of the court matters," he said.
Sureck said the INS would take no action regarding deportation until after Polanski is sentenced.
Polanski, known for his fascination with macabre subjects on the screen, won fame with such films as "Rosemary's Baby," "Knife in the Water."
"Macbeth" and "Chinatown."
He was on assignment for the French edition of Vogue Magazine when he hired the teen-age girl to pose last March.
It was alleged he took her to Nicholson's home while the actor was away, gave her champagne and the drug quaalude, then raped her.
The girl's sister overheard her telling a boyfriend about the sexual encounter on the phone and told her mother, police said. The mother filed a complaint and Polanski was arrested.
At first, Polanski's attorney, Douglas Dalton, said he would claim the sexual encounter never happened and the girl fantanized it.
But Gunson said Monday that Polanski changed his mind primarily because of actress Anjelica Huston's decison to testify against him.
Miss Huston, daughter of director John Huston and Nicholson's longtime roommate, reportedly said she arrived home while Polanski and the girl were in a bedroom.
The district attorney's office agreed to drop Miss Huston's prosecution for cocaine possession when she offered to tesify.

The Associated Press September 19, 1977

Movie director Roman Polanski, who has pleaded guilty to unlawful sexual intercourse with a 13-year-old girl, Monday was ordered imprisoned for a 90-day psychiatric study to help the judge decide his sentence.
However, the 44-year-old
Polanski, director of such movies as "Chinatown" and "Rosemary's Baby," won a three month delay of his incarceration in order to finish a movie he is making in Tahiti.
Superior Court Judge Laurence Rittenband, noting the teen-age girl "look older than her years" and was sexually experienced, nevertheless scolded the director for taking advantage of her.
"ALthough the victim was not an inexperienced and unsophisticated young girl," the judge said, "this fact was not a license to the defendant, a man of the world in his 40s, to engage in an act of sexual intercourse with her, however submissive or uninhibited she might have been."Rittenband, who received reports from psychiatrists on
Polanski's mental state, ruled that the director was not a mentally disordered sex offender. He said the teen-age girl and her parents had asked that Polanski not be imprisoned.
But Rittenband said he is mindful of public concern about the problem of rape. "This heinous offense is also of profound concern to our judicial system," he said, adding that the crime to which
Polanski pleaded guilty previously was called statutory rape.
As
Polanski stood calm and silent beside his attorney, the judge described for the first time the young model whose identity had been kept secret since Polanski was first charged last March with rape and drug abuse.
"The probation report discloses that although just short of her 14th birthday at the time of the offense, the victim was a well-developed young girl who looked older than her years," the judge said, "and regrettably was not unschooled in sexual matters.
"She has a 17-year-old boyfriend with whom she had sexual intercourse at least twice prior to the offense involved." He said that perhaps the boyfriend should also be charged with a crime.
Rittenband said the girl also "was not unfamiliar with the drug Quaalude, she having experimented with it as early as her 10th or 11th year. This was the same drug furnished to her by the defendant."
But the judge said none of this excused
Polanski, who had contracted to photograph the girl for a French fashion magazine. prosecutors said he took her to the home of actor Jack Nicholson while Nicholson was away, fed her champagne and Quaaludes, then committed numerous sex acts with her.
The probation report indicated that she consented. The judge said it made no difference.
"The law was designed for the protection of females under the age of 18 years," the judge said, "and it is no defense to such a charge that the female might not have resisted the act."
He chastised the girl's mother for permitting the teen-ager to go with
Polanski unchaperoned.
But the prosecutor, urging a prison sentence for
Polanski, said the mother had been wrongly blamed by the public for her daughter's predicament.
"The mother asked to go on that photo assignment," said Deputy Dist. Atty. Roger Gunson. "It was Mr.
Polanski who suggested the mother not go because it might inhibit the girl at the photo session."
Polanski's attorney, Douglas Dalton, argued for straight probation. He cited the director's tragic life, an apparent reference to his childhood in a Nazi concentration camp and the murder of his wife, actress Sharon Tate, by the Charles Manson family.
" . . . He stands before this court with a conviction of unlawful sexual intercourse with a minor," said Dalton. "It's not even a criminal offense in about 13 of our states and many places in the world . . . it is a serious crime, but not a unique crime. It's a crime that has been committed by police officers."
Dalton was alluding to a recent scandal in which Hollywood police officers had sex with teen-age girl explorer scouts.
The judge ordered
Polanski to appear at the state prison facility at at Chicago on Dec. 19. He scheduled sentencing for three months later.
Outside court, Gunson said, "There is a strong likelihood of probation following the 90-day study."
The technical effect of the judge's decision will be for
Polanski to spend some time in prison without having the record of a prison sentence against him unless he is eventually placed behind bars under a formal sentence.
Among the problems
Polanski faces is possible deportation. However, the law provides automatic deportation only for those convicted of crimes of moral turpitude who are sentenced to one year or more in prison.

The Associated Press February 1, 1978...

Film director Roman Polanski fled the country to avoid sentencing for a sex offense involving a 13-year-old schoolgirl, his attorney revealed to the stunned spectator crowding a courtroom Wednesday.
A bench warrant was immediately issued for the arrest of the 44-year-old fugitive director, a French citizen. If he is arrested in another country, extradition proceedings might be needed, the judge said. He also indicated Polanski could be sentenced in absentia if he does not show up within 10 days.In London, British Airways officials said Polanski arrived at Heathrow Airport early Wednesday. They said the airline's reservations desk in Los Angeles gave Polanski the last seat on BA598, one of two daily British Airways flights from Los Angeles to London, and he landed at Heathrow at 11:47 a.m. 6:47 a.m. EST.
It was not known whether Polanski was staying in London or whether he had gone on the Paris.
Polanski, who was married to murdered actress Sharon Tate and is famed for such films as "Rosemary's Baby" and "Chinatown," could be sentenced to serve up to 50 years in prison. Any sentence over one year would mean automatic deportation, unless the judge recommended otherwise.
Attorney Douglas Dalton, who was to represent Polanski at Wednesday's sentencing, shocked the packed court with news of his clients's flight.
"Your honor," he told Superior Court Judge Laurence J. Rittenband, "I received a call from Mr. Polanski advising me he would not be here this morning."
"Well, where is he?" the judge asked.
"I do not believe he is in the United States," Dalton said.
He declined to reveal where Polanski had taken refuge but said he would try to persuade him to return. He said Polanski promised to phone him again to discuss the matter.
Deputy District Attorney Roger Gunson said latter, "I suspect he is in a country where a plea to unlawful sexual intercourse would not be an extraditable offense. It could be in France."
He noted that Polanski, of Polish descent, maintains a home in Paris. He was believe to be traveling on a French passport.
Polanski, who pleaded guilty to unlawful sexual intercourse with the Woodland Hills schoolgirl, was released from prison Friday after 42 days of psychiatric tests which were to help determine his sentence.
He had been held at the California Men's Institute at Chino during the diagnostic period. However, during nearly one year of litigation on the matter, Rittenhand had permitted Polanski to travel freely abroad on $2,500 bail, and he always returned at the appointed time.
Since Miss Tate was slain in 1969 by the Charles Manson family, Polanski has not owned a home in the Los Angeles area but has stayed at various hotels while working on films.
Last March he was arrested and charged with raping and drugging the 13-year-old girl during a photography session at the home of actor Jack Nicholson. Nicholson was out of town at the time.
At first, Polanski said he was innocent. But after lengthy negotiations with authorities, a plea bargain was announced.
Polanski pleaded guilty Aug. 8 to one sex offense in return for dismissal of five other sex and drug charges.
Polanski had originally planned to go to Tahiti after his legal troubles were over. He had been signed to direct the movie "Hurricane," filming in Bora Bora. But while he was in prison, producer Dino De Laurentiis announced he was dropping Polanski from the picture because of the uncertainty of his future availability.
De Laurentiis named Swedish filmmaker Jan Troell on Wednesday to succeed Polanski as director of the disaster epic.

No comments: